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Interesting Links 7 April 2014

Spring has sprung. Well at least the last of the snow is gone. Seems like late here but it hardly matters as I’ve been busy with school anyway. Seems like last week was slow for me on the Internet at least. Not to fear though I have a couple of links to share.

what is computational thinking? What indeed? This is a great explanation from the UK’s Computing At School site.

World Wide Access: Accessible Web Design video  I’m trying hard to get my students to understand the importance of making web pages accessible. This video from the University of Washington is a big help.

Why (And How) Students Are Learning To Code An infographic with a lot of information. 

Majors with the Most Pre-Graduation Job Offers. According to a recent study, students in these degrees receive more job offers before graduation.  Computer Science tops the list! 

How do we make programming languages more usable and learnable? A lot of discussion in the comments as well. Another great post by Mark Guzdial.

Senator Gillibrand Proposes New Legislation for Computer Science education 

Penn Scientists Teach Computer Programs How to Teach Programming  some news at Communications of the ACM.

Categories: Planet

How Can You Turn Adversaries Into Allies? with Bob Burg

Cool Cat Teacher Blog Vicki Davis - 7 April, 2014 - 20:34

Bob Burg @BobBurg has some fascinating advice for how to turn adversaries into allies with his new book Adversaries into Allies: Win People Over Without Manipulation or Coercion. As teachers, we never know when we’re going to have a tough situation walk through our door or barge into our inbox, so his advice is very helpful and timely for all of us – especially during high-stress times of the school year. (Like testing or the end of the year for those of us in the northern hemisphere.)

Who will want to listen to this show

Everyone who might have someone get angry with them. That’s all of you. We all need this relational advice and Bob gives some good ones.

I particularly like with Bob talks about how you view adversaries — are they really your adversary? Some of his thoughts are reminiscent of Dale Carnegie, but with a slightly different take.

Listen to the show

Listen to Bob Burg

Add Bob Burg to your PLN

Bob Burg
Blog: http://www.burg.com/blog/
Twitter: @BobBurg

You’ll want to pick up Adversaries into Allies. Bob has a thought provoking blog and I was quite intrigued at his recent post about Why So Many People Sabotage Their Happiness. We see this in kids (and teachers) who just seem to wreck the very thing that can bring them joy.

We all must challenge ourselves to improve our interpersonal relations with parents, administrators, colleagues and students.

The post How Can You Turn Adversaries Into Allies? with Bob Burg appeared first on Cool Cat Teacher Blog.

Categories: Planet

'River of blood' after drone 'hits' Australian athlete

The Age Technology - 7 April, 2014 - 17:30
The Civil Aviation Safety Authority says it is investigating an incident that involved an athlete in a West Australian triathlon being injured by a drone that was filming the event.






Categories: Planet

Silverton’s silver lining

Bluyonder Greg Whitby - 7 April, 2014 - 17:07

Tony Bryant with Silverton PS students.

I had a chance to catch up recently with Tony Bryant, principal of Silverton Primary School in Victoria. If you’ve been reading bluyonder for a while you’ll know that I’ve visited Silverton PS over several years.  I believe Tony is one of this country’s most innovative school leaders and as he would tell you, their overnight success story has only taken twenty years of relentless focus.

The first thing you notice when you walk through the doors is that change is happening constantly.  This isn’t change for change sake but change as a result of continuous improvement, feedback and reflection.  There is an obvious passion for learning both at student and teacher level.  The teachers I spoke to tell you that it is an absolute pleasure to come to work each day; to be a part of a collaborative and committed team of professional educators.  This cannot be sustained without strong leadership. Silverton is a partnership between Tony, his staff and their students.

John Hattie talks about visible learning and teaching and that is exactly what is happening at Silverton.  Students take ownership of their learning, they set their own goals and articulate their learning so by the end of the term they can plot where they need to go next.  This does not happen without a high level of trust and respect.

Stephen Heppell always makes the point that when students are engaged in their learning we see how ambitious they can be.  What we sometimes forget is the central role, indeed the responsibility of teachers and of course leaders, to make sure that students are engaged because engagement is an imperative for academic achievement.

Despite the entrenched educational practices and mindsets of a century and more, Tony and his team have turned learning and teaching on its head.  It hasn’t been achieved with bucket loads of money but with a belief in students’ ability, a passion for learning and regular evaluation. Silverton PS isn’t the only school where this is happening and happening well but to see the theory in practice and to see students becoming their own teachers is after all this time still pretty awesome.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Categories: Planet

Myths of Technology Series: “Don’t Talk To Strangers”

The Principal of Change George Couros - 5 April, 2014 - 05:31

For ISTE 2014 in Atlanta, I will be presenting on the “Myths of Technology and Learning”. As I am really thinking about what I will be sharing at the conference, I wanted to write a series of blog posts that will help myself and others “rethink” some of these statements or arguments that you hear in relation to technology in school.  I will be writing a series of blog posts on different myths, and will be posting them on this page.  I hope to generate discussion on these topics to further my own learning in this area and appreciate any comments you have on each idea shared.

As kids, we were continuously told “don’t talk to strangers”, and this generation has been told the same thing.  Times have changed and we have to really rethink this notion.

If you really think about it, everyone you are close with now was a stranger at one point.  Not only does that notion come to play, but as adults, we have to realize that it is much more common for people to meet someone online first.  Online dating has moved away from being “taboo”, it has become the norm.  If you took it even further, many people probably meet friends online first.  My time connecting online, has actually helped me to connect with some of my best friends in the world.  Similar to online dating, many of these friends that I have become closest with have a list of qualities that I was drawn to that I may not have necessarily met if I was only open to “offline” connections.

Kids are also starting to create those environments for themselves as well.  Danah Boyd discusses in her book on “Networked Teens”, how kids are using social media to connect with peers that have similar interests.  One example I have seen was a student in a small community who had a unique interest in gaming, use his Instagram account to connect with other gamers.  None of these people were in his class, and could have lived in different countries, yet they were all people that this student identified with and gave him a sense of belonging.  There are many kids in our schools that would benefit from a sense of belonging.

As I continue to do workshops with students, I have continuously asked them, “How many of you have met someone online first, and them met online.  Years ago, my guess would be that the percentage would be very low, but I consistently get above half of the room raising their hands.  I would also guess that several students chose not to raise their hands because they have been continuously told that this is something that they shouldn’t do, while we as adults, continue to do this ourselves.  Safety should always be our number one concern, so if we are going to help kids be safe in a networked world, we have to think differently.

One suggestion that I have given students is that they have connected with someone online that they want to meet in person, they should talk to their parents first and arrange a video chat with their mom or dad in the room.  Not hovering over their shoulder, but so that it is obvious that the parent is present.  They could arrange to meet somewhere where their parent drops them off, and is around.  Obviously this depends upon the age of the child, and some still might scoff at the idea, but it is a lot safer than pretending this could never happen and covering our eyes.  We have to start thinking about different approaches to keep our kids safe in such a networked world.

Many educators, such as Kelli Holden from Parkland School Division, understand the power there is connecting with “strangers” and has focused on modelling the power of social media with her students, which has made a tremendous impact on their learning.  Using a classroom Twitter account, Kelli will ask questions of the “world” that are often developed with her students, and they will learn a great deal about the rest of the world.  Using the hashtag, #whatsdoesyourspringlike, her students displayed a picture of the weather outside in Spruce Grove, Alberta, Canada, and received responses from around the world, including Palm Springs, Washington,  Norway , Tokyo, amongst many others.  If we want our students to have a “global awareness”, we have to teach them how to safely connect with others.

If I think about my experience with a subject such as science, I remember losing interest quickly.  This lack of passion for the subject probably spilled over to my own students in my first few years of teaching, as I never really understood or developed a love for the subject.  But now, with the ability to connect with biologists, physicists, astronauts, or even classes around the world, there is an opportunity to learn about science from “scientists”.

If we let our notion of what a “stranger” is and decide not to connect with these people, we are taking away tremendous opportunities from our students.  Instead of the idea that we “shouldn’t talk to strangers”, maybe we need to focus on Bill Nye’s notion that “everyone you meet knows something you don’t” and teach our students how to be safe in a world that is powerfully connected.

Categories: Planet

Default password leaves thousands at risk

The Age Technology - 4 April, 2014 - 12:07

When Alex* found flaw in his cable modem that allowed anyone to receive and make calls using his number, his jaw dropped.






Categories: Planet

Moving to the Cloud? What should you consider?

Lucacept - Jenny Luca - 3 April, 2014 - 17:31

This year our school has adopted Google Apps for Education. Sounds simple, huh?

Not so. Decisions to move your staff and students into Cloud Computing solutions are complex and in my view, require thoughtful planning and consideration. When I became Director of ICT and eLearning at the start of 2013, my first job was to implement a new Learning Management System. That was pretty big and was the main focus for much of 2013, but the early stages of that project coincided with planning starting around the possibility of a move into the Google Apps space.

Why Google Apps? Plenty of reasons, but here are just a few.

The collaborative nature of the docs – the way students can work together and co-create. The visibility of works in progress when shared with teachers. The ability to provide feedback and formative assessment easily at point of need, when students are in the process of writing. The cloud storage provided to users – 30GB for each user when you’re a Google Apps for Education school. Providing staff with a cloud storage option that sits within your domain, instead of having staff opening their own cloud storage accounts eg: Dropbox, and sharing school docs outside of a school domain. I’ll elaborate further on my reasoning in another post (and I promise I’ll get to it!!).

But before any decisions could be made, I needed to familiarise myself with issues surrounding Cloud Computing so that I could evaluate whether or not a move in this direction was right for my school. What did this involve? Reading, and plenty of it. I looked at Gartner and Forrester research and followed links shared on Twitter to business blogs like Harvard Business Review and Forbes. I needed to see where business was heading and explore speculation about the future of work and what might be required. I read countless articles about cloud storage and privacy concerns. And through all this, I was linking what I was reading to the education system and analysing how what applies in business translates to school environments.

Coming across Data Sovereignty and the Cloud: A Board and Executive Officer’s Guide , published by the Cyberspace Law and Policy Centre, UNSW Faculty of Law was fortuitous. The report was sponsored by  NEXTDCBaker & McKenzie and Aon. NEXTDC is a data centre company, looking to become the biggest cloud data centre storage service in Australia. I have visited their Port Melbourne location, taking a tour through what is an impressive facility. Baker and McKenzie are a law firm and Aon is a global provider of risk management services. When you look at recent changes to Australian Privacy Laws you can see why organisations like this are interested in supporting research and policy reports of this nature. Australian Privacy Principle 8 deals with cross border disclosure of personal information – an area affecting schools and businesses if you use a cloud computing solution where the data is stored in overseas data centres.

The report raised many questions for me, and led to a 90 minute phone conversation with David Vaile, one of the authors of the report. Even at the end of that, I was no closer to firm resolve around the issues surrounding cloud computing and privacy. Within the report is reference to the Australian Signals Directorate’s (Defence Force) Cloud Computing considerations. Their discussion paper provides the following:

“…assists agencies to perform a risk assessment and make an informed decision as to whether cloud computing is currently suitable to meet their business goals with an acceptable level of risk.”

Contained within it is an overview of Cloud Computing considerations you can apply to whatever platform you are looking at implementing. In my case, this was Google Apps for Education. What I did was take this list (as follows) and then read Google Security Whitepapers and information about GAFE and found the information that addressed the following considerations.

  1. Cloud computing security considerations include:
    • My data or functionality to be moved to the cloud is not business critical (19a).
    • I have reviewed the vendor’s business continuity and disaster recovery plan (19b).
    • I will maintain an up to date backup copy of my data (19c).
    • My data or business functionality will be replicated with a second vendor (19d).
    • The network connection between me and the vendor’s network is adequate (19e).
    • The Service Level Agreement (SLA) guarantees adequate system availability (19f).
    • Scheduled outages are acceptable both in duration and time of day (19g).
    • Scheduled outages affect the guaranteed percentage of system availability (19h).
    • I would receive adequate compensation for a breach of the SLA or contract (19i).
    • Redundancy mechanisms and offsite backups prevent data corruption or loss (19j).
    • If I accidentally delete a file or other data, the vendor can quickly restore it (19k).
    • I can increase my use of the vendor’s computing resources at short notice (19l).
    • I can easily move my data to another vendor or in-house (19m).
    • I can easily move my standardised application to another vendor or in-house (19m).
    • My choice of cloud sharing model aligns with my risk tolerance (20a).
    • My data is not too sensitive to store or process in the cloud (20b).
    • I can meet the legislative obligations to protect and manage my data (20c).
    • I know and accept the privacy laws of countries that have access to my data (20d).
    • Strong encryption approved by DSD protects my sensitive data at all times (20e).
    • The vendor suitably sanitises storage media storing my data at its end of life (20f).
    • The vendor securely monitors the computers that store or process my data (20g).
    • I can use my existing tools to monitor my use of the vendor’s services (20h).
    • I retain legal ownership of my data (20i).
    • The vendor has a secure gateway environment (20j).
    • The vendor’s gateway is certified by an authoritative third party (20k).
    • The vendor provides a suitable email content filtering capability (20l).
    • The vendor’s security posture is supported by policies and processes (20m).
    • The vendor’s security posture is supported by direct technical controls (20n).
    • I can audit the vendor’s security or access reputable third-party audit reports (20o).
    • The vendor supports the identity and access management system that I use (20p).
    • Users access and store sensitive data only via trusted operating environments (20q).
    • The vendor uses endorsed physical security products and devices (20r).
    • The vendor’s procurement process for software and hardware is trustworthy (20s).
    • The vendor adequately separates me and my data from other customers (21a).
    • Using the vendor’s cloud does not weaken my network security posture (21b).
    • I have the option of using computers that are dedicated to my exclusive use (21c).
    • When I delete my data, the storage media is sanitised before being reused (21d).
    • The vendor does not know the password or key used to decrypt my data (22a).
    • The vendor performs appropriate personnel vetting and employment checks (22b).
    • Actions performed by the vendor’s employees are logged and reviewed (22c).
    • Visitors to the vendor’s data centres are positively identified and escorted (22d).
    • Vendor data centres have cable management practices to identify tampering (22e).
    • Vendor security considerations apply equally to the vendor’s subcontractors (22f).
    • The vendor is contactable and provides timely responses and support (23a).
    • I have reviewed the vendor’s security incident response plan (23b).
    • The vendor’s employees are trained to detect and handle security incidents (23c).
    • The vendor will notify me of security incidents (23d).
    • The vendor will assist me with security investigations and legal discovery (23e).
    • I can access audit logs and other evidence to perform a forensic investigation (23f).
    • I receive adequate compensation for a security breach caused by the vendor (23g).
    • Storage media storing sensitive data can be adequately sanitised (23h).
    • ( Cloud Computing Security Considerations )

This took some time. There were weeks out of my life in 2103 where I was living and breathing information regarding privacy, security and cloud computing. Believe you me, if you encountered me during this time, my conversation topics were limited and suitable only for a specific audience!

But, it was worth it. I had a document I could present to my Executive that helped us come to the decision that Google Apps for Education was suitable for our school environment. What I gained from this exercise was a thorough understanding of issues surrounding Cloud Computing and the information I needed to be able to speak confidently with my school community about the move we were making.

If you’re a school looking to move into the Cloud Computing space, then measures like this are necessary. If you’re an Australian school looking for links to assist you with the process, then take a look at the following.

Defence Signals Directorate – Cloud Computing Considerations

http://www.dsd.gov.au/publications/csocprotect/cloud_computing_security_considerations.htm

 

Data Sovereignty and the Cloud  - a Board and Executive Officer’s Guide

http://cyberlawcentre.org/data_sovereignty/CLOUD_DataSovReport_Full.pdf

And if you’re looking to go Google, the following will help.

Google’s approach to IT Security – A Google Whitepaper

https://cloud.google.com/files/Google-CommonSecurity-WhitePaper-v1.4.pdf

 

Google Apps Service Level Agreement

http://www.google.com/apps/intl/en/terms/sla.html

Google Apps Documentation and Support – Security and Privacy Overview

http://support.google.com/a/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=60762

Google Apps for Education

http://www.google.com/enterprise/apps/education/benefits.html

 

Security Whitepaper: Google Apps Messaging and Collaboration Products

http://static.googleusercontent.com/external_content/untrusted_dlcp/www.google.com/en/us/a/help/intl/en-GB/admins/pdf/ds_gsa_apps_whitepaper_0207.pdf

It’s not over for me. The next thing to consider is replication of data to cloud storage. Off I am to the Amazon Web Summit next week in Sydney to explore that one a little further. ;)

 


Categories: Planet

So what is Technology Integration?

Chris Betcher - 3 April, 2014 - 01:05

I was asked by a colleague in another school the other day if I could give her a snapshot into what I actually do, and what the role of an ICT Integrator actually looks like (from my perspective anyway). Apparently she wants to talk to her school leaders about having an integrator on their staff and was trying to get an idea of what the role would entail from someone who does it.

Whenever people I meet ask me what I do, they have often never heard the term “ICT Integrator”. It’s another one of those jobs that didn’t exist when most of us were in school. We say all the time that we should be preparing our students for jobs that don’t yet exist, and this role is a good example of that.

I have a couple of  simple “elevator pitch” descriptions that I often use to tell people what my job involves…

  • “I look at the stuff kids are supposed to learn in school and help teachers figure out where technology can help make that learning richer and more meaningful.”
  • ” I look at technology and curriculum and try to mash them together so that learning becomes more relevant and interesting.”
  • “I help combine technology that changes all the time, with schools that don’t.”

Basically, the role of a tech integrator is all about finding ways that technology can assist learning, and helping teachers and students make the most of it. To do that we try to think about things like the SAMR Model, the TPACK Model, Blooms Taxonomy, Multiple Intelligences, Visible Thinking, Dweck’s Mindsets, etc, etc, and figure out how technology can assist to make them work even better. We need to be able to identify opportunities in the curriculum where technology can help make it richer, and I think we also need to be wise enough to recognise when technology is not the right answer too.

To be a tech integrator requires a lot of dealing with people, both big people and little people. We work with kids of all ages and adults who sometimes act like kids of all ages. We have to be able to push people out of their comfort zone enough that they will take risks and try new things, but not so hard that they get their back up and refuse to play. We have to deal with the natural human tendency to resist change, while helping schools redefine themselves as they adapt to new ways of learning and teaching. We have to be teachers, learners, psychologists, trainers, guides. We need to be techie enough to understand how technology works and what we might do with it, but we need to play it down so that we don’t appear to be too geeky and nerdy. (Even if we secretly wear our nerdiness like  badge of honour)

We need to understand that 95% of the teachers we work with will never even think about changing the default settings on their computers, while 95% of the students we work with will refuse to leave the default settings alone.

We need to understand new technologies and be able to see the potential they offer for learning. We need to understand not only what’s new and hot, but also what’s solid and fundamental. We know about iPad and Apps and Chromebooks and Tablets, and we don’t just know what terms like Web 2.0 and the “Internet of Things” mean, we also know about Flipped Learning and the Jigsaw Classroom. We need to be as comfortable with new operating systems as we are with the new curriculum, and we need to know how to deal with both of them.

If you’re only a technician, you probably won’t make a good ICT Integrator. If you love devices and gadgets more than you love kids and learning, this job is not for you.

As an ICT Integrator you create an important interface between the teaching staff and the technical staff in a school. Each of these groups seems to think the others are obstructionists who just don’t understand what truly matters, so you need to be able to straddle both worlds and act as the interface between them. Integrators need to be able to talk tech and mean it. Although the people who speak all the technical mumbo jumbo are critically important in a school,  for god’s sake don’t let them make curriculum decisions! Too often in schools the technology decisions are  based on what’s convenient for the technical team, not what’s best for the learning of the kids. That happens way too often, in too many place, so don’t fall in to that trap. Schools are about learning. Let’s keep it that way.

As an integrator, you need to be flexible, creative and know a little about a lot. Good general knowledge really helps. You need to stay current with technological trends as well as educational shifts. You often work across grades and faculties, so you get to see the big picture across the school. But because you’re so close to the action in the classroom you also see the real picture. Your school might spin good PR, but as an ICT Integrator you get to cut through the crap and see what actually happens in classrooms. Sometimes it’s awe inspiring, and sometimes it ain’t pretty.

You understand that technology changes things in a classroom.  As Seymour Papert observed long ago, something very special happens when you put kids and computers together. It changes student motivation and enhances student engagement. The learning changes. The nature of the teaching changes. Or at least it should. When you put technology in the hands of kids, suddenly having them sit in rows and work at the same rate on the same problems doesn’t seem to make as much sense. Some teachers are not prepared for that shift, and that’s what the integrator is there to help with. To reassure them that learning can come from chaos and that they really don’t all need to be doing the same exercise in the same way at the same time.

It’s a pretty unique role.

Photo by Chris Betcher CC BY-SA

The post So what is Technology Integration? appeared first on Betchablog.

Related posts:

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  2. Changing the Bathwater, Keeping the Baby

Categories: , Planet

Building the (Minecraft) lost city of Babylon

HeyJude Judy O'Connell - 23 March, 2014 - 21:04

Regular reports hit my radar of the amazing work being undertaken by global kids, as they become knowledge-able, as well as knowledgeable in their gaming interactions. Many kids, supported by knowledgeable elders (parents and peers) are engaging in this amazing platform. Many teachers are also supporting their students to do amazing things.

Just look at this gorgeous build in Minecraft – Babylon in a very new world of our kids futures.  By amazing – I don’t just mean building in a gaming environment! I mean engaging in literacy  and communication; in digital citizenship and story telling;  and above all creativity and global cultures. But it takes dedication on the part of the adults to nuture students this way.

Minecraft in education is growing phenomenon – and people are jumping on board to see how they can integrate Minecraft into the learning cultures of their schools. To be honest – Minecraft is also becoming a minefield of its very own in the ‘grown up world’ (consultant warning) – and therefore making it critically important that we connect with quality users with grounded experience in best practices in Minecraft rather than with consultants.

Project Mist

Project Mist, from Donelle Batty, is one of my favourite Australian leaders – doing with her kids daily that we could only wish for all our kids. Donelle has been running Project M.I.S.T (Minecraft In School Transforming education) for what seems like eons now. Her students have very powerful learning experiences. GMods Experience in Minecraft tells it all!

My experience in Minecraft this year was spectacular; the team work, the efforts, the creativity gained and witnessed was truly outstanding. In the class I got to socialize with kids that have the same interests I have, building friendships throughout the year. Cooperation was the biggest highlight; When there was ridiculous amounts of mobs and high death count, we took shelter and shared supplies. When someone needed help building or creating something it always felt good to teach them how to do so. I’ve also learnt more about the importance of my appearance on-line and how I present myself to the people of the world wide web, presentation is key and your first impression is everything. If you are acting like a tool on the internet people will see you once and think: “Wow, that person seems stupid and rude” And that would be the last time they visit your page/ sever/ profile.

Recently, I followed a tweet to see what Donelle wrote about the 2014 launch of #ProjectMIST.

2014 #ProjectMIST is about to start, it takes a dedicated community to do this! http://t.co/HwGMrUlHI5 #minecraft @natbott42

— Donelle Batty (@dbatty1) March 21, 2014

She reminded us all that Minecraft is a collaborative experience, as is the various stages of learning involved in gaining Minecraft experience. Donelle is without a doubt a global leader, and will be away from her hometown in Tasmania on her Hardie Fellow (Info re Hardie Fellowship and recipients for 2013-14).

Donelle also reminded me of the fantastic work done by Jo Kay who is an amazing colleague I have worked with closely over the years on various projects.  Jo currently builds and supports our work in the Master of Education (Knowledge Networks and Digital Innovation) degree here at CSU. We don’t use the normal LMS, but have developed our own for the degree for now.

So in much the same way Donelle explains:

We are really lucky at ProjectMIST as we have one person who has been with us from the start and is always there, even at 12:04am. At this time of the day I am in bed asleep and the computer is asleep too, but Jo Kay is wide awake supporting the students where I can’t. Her support is extremely appreciated by the students and they demonstrate this through building replicas of her avatar on their own servers, one young man did this just the other night when she helped him out after he locked himself out of his server. This student has now just been accepted onto Massively @ Jokaydia Minecraft Guild and he is really excited to be able to build, learn and explore with others from all parts of the world.

If you are an educator, a parent, or just someone who wants to give kids a chance at Minecraft I recommend you visit Massively @ Jokaydia.

The Massively @ jokaydia Guild Website –  a community supported by jokaydia.com -  provides kids and parents with games-based spaces to learn, collaborate and play!

The project is designed for kids aged 4-16yrs who are interested in gaining digital media skills, exploring their creativity and developing online social skills. We are currently using the video game Minecraft to support a safe, whitelisted server and a range of activities which encourage kids to choose their own playful learning pathways and adventures.

You can’t do better than that!  Babylon was a build created by just one of those students!

You will find Donelle on Twitter @dbatty1 and Jo at @JoKay. You’ll also find student Nat, from the TedEX video below @natbott42

Image: cc licensed ( BY NC SA ) flickr photo shared by Jo Kay

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Filed under: Innovation & Creativity, Maker culture, Technology and Software Tagged: minecraft
Categories: Planet

Shrinking the world after 4000 years

HeyJude Judy O'Connell - 23 March, 2014 - 15:06

Quite a while back I read the book by John Freeman called Shrinking the World – the 4000 year story of how email came to rule our lives!  A ripping read, that contextualises email into the early 21st century communication systems as a derivative of human interactions through the ages.

We are now working in an era of constant interruptions. We nearly all have multiple email accounts which we use for a variety of purposes. Some eschew rapid communication still, of course,  along the lines of “oh I don’t want a gmail account, and please don’t expect me to create one so that I can participate in a google hangout for the conference/professional development/learning activity”.  Others of course have moved well on from email, making equally boring comments like “who uses email now anyway”?

If you work for a large organisation – as I do – the likelihood is that you will be using email. In fact, email remains a core professional communication tool alongside other forms of communication – Yammer being one example in my institution.

To be honest, I don’t have a problem with email – when it is used properly!   Ah, but there’s the catch.  Like any media tool, there are savvy users, and there are others.  And it is  the ‘others’ really who just confound the efficiency of the thing :-)

Freedman says:

One of the great paradoxes about email is that although it is created, driven and indelibly marked by ourselves, heavy use of it can leave you feeling emptied out, voided, fractured into a million bits and quips, yet somehow obliterated.

Overall his book is an attempt to step back from the frenzy and the flurry of now – the now we have created and the now we have to slowly remove ourselves from. He suggests that email is good for many things; but that we need to learn to use if far more sparingly, with far less dependency if we are to gain control of our lives.

I don’t agree with this – I think there are significantly  important points at the central purpose and value of email. Of course social media is giving us levels of connectivity across platforms, organisations and devices that email never set out to do.

But email itself, while still at the centre of an organisation, also needs to be used effectively. Let me tell you there are some basic aspects of email that can allow you to manage your workflow AND use the tool efficiently. Here are a few starting points: 

1. Don’t take forever to respond to an email message.  You may be busy, and if you haven’t time to give a considered and full response, have the courtesy to reply and indicate a timeline for response.  Not replying at all is discourteous.  If you can’t reply – put on your vacation message, or your ‘out of office’ message as a quick way to let people know that your inbox is in fact working.

2. Treat your students with respect. If you work in a tertiary institution treat students with the same respect you would accord to any adult you have contact with. I can’t tell you how many times students have been shocked to receive a reply from me the same day – they are accustomed to the (almost inexcusable) approach of treating virtual contact with students the same way as consultation hours with the tutor in a f2f setting – i.e. once or twice a week.

3. Use distribution lists or group lists to hold a conversation about a topic

4. Organise conversations logically. When in a group conversation – for heavens sake reply to the latest message.  The way that people fragment the conversation by simply replying to the first message, or one somewhere in-between is not only inefficient but also transparently discourteous.  If you were standing in a group around the water cooler – how would you feel if everyone simply acted as if you weren’t there.  Same thing.

4. For goodness sake use proper formatting.  We have a wonderful written language. We communicate in proper sentences when we write. We also speak sensibly and courteously with each other.  Yet for some reason, people apply kindergarten rules to email which look like this:

Dear Person I just like to write my comments all in one sentence and/or maybe a paragraph because it’s too hard to apply proper punctuation or even structure the message intelligibly and did you have a nice weekend Judy

While I can accept this in casual social media settings, to my way of thinking professional conversations in corporate email should also utilise the full affordances of the English language and supporting email structures.  I actually find it vaguely rude when a colleague doesn’t.

5. Turn on your auto-signature. I can’t tell you the number of times I have had to chase up a person’s contact details because the courtesy of having the full signature file is not utilised.  In a large organisation, transparency of conversation is essential.  If I need to phone you, or forward your email to another for response it should be clear who you are and in what capacity we are having our email conversations.

You’re probably thinking this is all very ‘old school’.  Perhaps it is!   But I’m convinced it’s part of the way to be professional, courteous and efficient with email until another tool arrives.

Image: cc licensed ( BY NC SA ) flickr photo shared by consumerfriendly


Filed under: Communication Tools Tagged: email, writing
Categories: Planet

Cloudy, with a chance of meatballs!

HeyJude Judy O'Connell - 19 March, 2014 - 11:01

Sometimes I feel that we as teachers are constantly 3 steps behind because by the time the whole staff are skilled up on a current technology, it and the students will have already moved on to the next thing.

These words and many more are part of the reflections of my students in INF530 Concepts and Practices of a Digital Age, the foundation subject of the MEd degree in knowledge networks and digital innovation I have been teaching in, since it’s launch this year. Three weeks in and the students have launched their reflective blogs, and been engaging in online spaces and places – some more so than others of course!

Three weeks is a short time, but in that time we have hit those cloudy spaces, and even meatballs (blog post title for one of the reflections – cool!).

Our course participants come from all areas of education: teachers, educational designers, e-learning advisors, higher education, Principals and Vice Principals in schools, and more. With this eclectic and amazing mix, we have almost everything we need in a cohort to challenge our thinking – mine included!

Here are some snippets:

I want to find new and better ways to inspire and motivate teachers to have a go in the networked learning environment, to become “connected educators” – what Tom Whitby defines as “teachers who are comfortable with collaborative learning, social media, and sharing their ideas online.” I share his concern of a “huge gulf now developing between connected and unconnected educators.”

I want to be able to use the right language to convey my passion, to be able to articulate in pedagogical terms why it is important to keep up and to back up what I say with compelling examples from research.

I hope to learn effective research skills that will enable me to find quality, trustworthy information;  develop a professional ‘digital learning’ network; and also build a solid understanding of how positive change can be implemented to help lift education institutions into the 21st century of learning.

Think more on the repercussions of global social networks and become more conversational about creative cultures and ways of doing, such as design thinking.

Develop a more evidence based approach to my teaching practice.

Share my ideas more openly; and learn by doing so.

We have already covered off the major thinkers in the field.  We are beginning our journey into the scholarship that underpins online environments – both in research and use of digital media and resources. We have an Amazon collection reading list for students to dip into and choose just one of these books to rigorously interrogate against the materials they are engaging with.

In another one of our other degree strands (but also part of the new degree), we have welcomed Australia’s teacher ambassador for Evernote into ETL523 Digital Citizenship in Schools.  It’s worth dropping over to Bec’s twitter feed or her post on “Organising my study with Evernote“.

Bec also wrote a post that included the following observationt:

One of the important messages about digital citizenship that we should be remembering and sharing with colleagues is the fact that we as teachers can not effectively educate students about the online world, digital citizenship or the notion of a digital footprint if we in fact are not partaking in the same social networks or using the same tools as our students.

Another important factor to consider, suggested by Nielsen (2011), is the notion of not confusing managing one’s digital footprint with being hidden or private. It is my understanding that a digital footprint should represent who we are and what we believe in a professional manner.

For some of us this seems obvious, yet not so for other educators – yet! We are struggling to encourage a few to understand the difference between privacy and adopting professional communication channels rather than a hidden persona.  Isn’t this exactly what we don’t want our school kids to do…hide… and then be ready to do whatever they like online?  The worse case scenarios are bullying or hacking.

Cloudy, with a chance of meatballs?

You bet – the unexpected is the common denominator in all our encounters in our learning journey together.  Thank you to my wonderful cohort – the world is going to be a better place for the willing engagement and generous learning mindset that you are bringing to your study!

I am so honoured to be able to engage with you all!

Image:cc licensed ( BY NC SA ) flickr photo shared by Alan


Filed under: Connectivism, Knowledge networks Tagged: education, Evernote, Tom Whitby
Categories: Planet
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